Woodward On Bush’s Legacy

By Justin Gardner | Related entries in Bush, History, Iraq, Video, War

He had the type of access to Bush that journalists would kill for and it resulted in a bunch of books about his Presidency that weren’t necessarily flattering.

Still, that doesn’t mean Bush’s presidency will be a failure…

Personally, I don’t think Iraqi democratization will ultimately turn out the way Bush and company said it would. Because my guess is that Iraq and Iran will form a political coalition and Iraq will seek to legitimize Iran’s nuclear program so down the road they can build their own nuclear program.

Because, like it or not, nuclear energy is clean and it’s the only way these Middle Eastern countries will survive after the oil runs out eventually. That will be the argument. That it’s actually a stabilizing force in the region. And Russia and China will obviously side with Iraq and Iran because they need access to oil so they can build up their infrastructures to compete with America.

Sound plausible?


This entry was posted on Tuesday, December 23rd, 2008 and is filed under Bush, History, Iraq, Video, War. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

4 Responses to “Woodward On Bush’s Legacy”

  1. Jimmy the Dhimmi Says:

    So if a democratic, ehtnically diverse nation that respects human rights and persecutes terrorists is able to successfully petition the international community to develop nuclear energy in a legal and verifyable way… that is somehow no less dangerous a legacy as a fascist dictator who supports international terrorist organizations and oppresses his people illegally developing nuclear weapons while obfuscating the international community’s attempts to thwart him?

    The former situation is what we are facing now, the latter is what we would be facing had it not been for regime change. We can debate whether it was worth the sacrifices or not, but it is clear to me that the former is a far better situation to be in, going forward, than the latter.

  2. TerenceC Says:

    Jimmy – use the “period” – I’m out of breath reading this. The Middle East including Syria, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Yemen, Oman, the Emirates, and yes Iraq and Iran have the fastest growing 18 to 26 year old population in the world – and no economy to absorb them. All of the natural resources they produce must be sold in order to fund their societies, begin a foundation for which an economy can grow, and provide jobs. If this doesn’t happen we’ll just have more disillusioned, angry, kids taking the easy way out strapped to a dynamite vest. Iran needs a nuclear program – so do all of the countries in Middle East because the opportunity cost for using their own natural resources is just too expensive. At some point you will realize how much the US F*&^ed up by going into Iraq to steal their oil. Until you do however, understand that there are millions upon millions of Arabs (and Caucasians since Persians are not Arabs) who just want to feed their families, keep a roof over their heads, and make it through the day happy and secure – just like you and me. You demonize an entire region of the globe (and the people who live there), when it is a select fanatical few who should hold your disregard – and who act to solicit your comments

  3. Jimmy the Dhimmi Says:

    All of the natural resources they produce must be sold in order to fund their societies, begin a foundation for which an economy can grow, and provide jobs. If this doesn’t happen we’ll just have more disillusioned, angry, kids taking the easy way out strapped to a dynamite vest.

    Great, then you seem to agree with me that Iraq now has a much brighter future than it would have had. Consider that prior to the invasion, Iraq was a humanitarian disaster after more than a decade of sanctions. Now its one of the only countries in the world right now that has a robustly growing GDP!

    At some point you will realize how much the US F*&^ed up by going into Iraq to steal their oil.

    At some point you will realize the utter bullshit of the “steal their oil” meme.

    You demonize an entire region of the globe (and the people who live there), when it is a select fanatical few who should hold your disregard

    You seem to hold these fanatical few in quite well regard, since you seem to want to orient America’s entire foreign policy towards what they want from us, rather than whats best for the security of the entire region. You also never seem to hold these fanatics morally responsible for what they do, instead, you blame Bush and America for stimulating them into blowing up people in Iraq, Afghanistan, India and the Philipeans for that matter.

    Who’s the one who demonizes the Arabs and Persians by having such low expectations of them? That members of these exotic races will naturally metamorphisize into bloodthirsty terrorists when they turn on the TV and learn that America invaded a country they’ve never been too, and removed a dictator whom they hated anyway, leaving behind a representative democracy in its place, all with too few troops and planning on leaving 30 days after the statues fell. As if we should just accept the natural disposition of these violence-prone creatures and placate the worst amongst them so they will stop attacking us.

    Funny, nobody seems to feel the same way about white people or Jews.

  4. kranky kritter Says:

    My understanding is that among our rationales for deposing Saddam and attempting to install a democracy is this rationale:

    Democracy is, in and of itself, a desirable good that produces better outcomes for the people of that democracy than other formats.

    Especially the format we overrode. Everyone out there is going to use his or her own measuring stick. I don’t agree with the one you’re using here.

    I don’t think that by intervening the US assumes primary responsibility for all future outcomes. We’ve obviously set Iraq on a different path than the one on which it once was. Where THAT path was headed is something none of us will ever know. So we ought to all accept that anything we say about that now unknowable outcome has been personally rectally extracted. Guessed at, IOW.

    As Iraq moves forward through time as a nation, its destiny will come to be determined by various inputs. The hope of democracy MUST be that Iraqis themselves become the primary masters of this destiny. I can’t stress that strongly enough. If we as Americans really, truly believe in democracy, then we must hope this as well, even at the risk of Iraqis choosing options which are far from ideal for America.

    Merry Christmas to all those who celebrate it, and happy holidays to all.

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