Broken English

By donar | Related entries in Cartoons, Immigration, Political Graffiti
english language law cartoon

I was inspired by this NY times post…


This entry was posted on Wednesday, January 14th, 2009 and is filed under Cartoons, Immigration, Political Graffiti. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

7 Responses to “Broken English”

  1. kranky kritter Says:

    I was inspired by the immigrant dunkin donuts clerk who wrote “hole milk” on my latte this sunday. While it didn’t trouble me, I found it pretty comical. Hey, at least SHE had an excuse, right?

  2. Chris Says:

    The language is a non-point after this study showed that our immigrant ancestors adopted english way slower than current immigrants: http://www.news.wisc.edu/15801

  3. 24AheadDotCom Says:

    Trust me on this! I have experience with those White Americans, and they all talk like that.

    Meanwhile, a smarter blog might want to look into what the NYT and their “broad coalition of civil rights groups, business leaders, ministers and immigration experts” want. Hint: money and power. And, they’re willing to smear people in order to get it.

    Next time, actually try to think things through.

  4. donar Says:

    English is a funny language. We never did standardized the spelling until the past century or two. Most of us native born Americans probably would fail a standard English test…or at least the cartoonists.

  5. kranky kritter Says:

    Chris, that shouldn’t be much of a surprise given that public schools didn’t begin to spread widely until the early 20th century.

    One thing that bothers me about this cartoon is the gratuitous stereotype of the rebel flag that the x on the guy’s hat is obviously mean to invoke.

    I’m fropm Massachusetts born and bred, but I agree with Patterson Hood of the Driveby Truckers when he says “Racism is a worldwide problem and it has been since the beginning of recorded history. And it ain’t just white and black. But thanks to George Wallace, it’s always a little more convenient to play it with a Southern accent.”

  6. donar Says:

    I apologize for any stereotypes, but living in South Carolina for the past three years, I have seen plenty of confederate flags right next to signs stating one nation, one language! It’s just a product of my environment, but it’s a national problem. Perhaps I should do several regional accents as to offend more evenly.

  7. sairah Says:

    can i use this for my IT AIDA gcse for school?

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