Wash Post: Obama, Romney Tied On Economy

By Justin Gardner | Related entries in Barack, Economy, Obama, Romney

It’s nearly June and unless the economy starts picking up significantly, Romney is likely to pull ahead in more polls like these…

The parity on economic issues foreshadows what probably will continue to be a tough and negative campaign. Overall, voters would be split 49 percent for Obama and 46 percent for Romney if the November election were held now. On handling the economy, they are tied at 47 percent.

Still, it appears as if confidence is picking up…

More than eight in 10 Americans still rate the national economy negatively, but there are strains of optimism as it continues to recover from the collapse of 2008. A majority of Americans — 54 percent — say they are more hopeful than anxious about the situation over the next few years, while 58 percent are bullish about their financial prospects.

More data points, this time from Gallup…and ranked in order of importance…

Do note that the federal budget deficit and debt ranks very high. Romney dominates that issue and will definitely be using it to bludgeon Obama’s economic message. If Barack doesn’t have an answer for that, it could become more important as a campaign issue.

More as it develops…


This entry was posted on Tuesday, May 22nd, 2012 and is filed under Barack, Economy, Obama, Romney. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

No Responses to “Wash Post: Obama, Romney Tied On Economy”

  1. cranky critter Says:

    I wish that polls like these would include the following breakout from respondents

    [ ] I am certain or nearly certain to vote to for Mitt Romney
    [ ] I am leaning towards voting for Mitt Romney
    [ ] I am undecided
    [ ] I am leaning towards voting for Barack Obama
    [ ] I am certain or nearly certain to vote to for Barack Obama

    That would tell us a lot more about trends and the outcome of the fall election. I don’t think more than 10% of likely voters at the very outside are undecided. I am pretty sure lots of people would SAY they are only leaning one way, But then if you followed up, you’d find 95% of those people followed through on that lean. Barring some real game-changer event.

  2. Exasperated Says:

    According to an article in yesterday’s WSJ, this recovery has been the slowest in 60 years of tracking by the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank and has been near or at the bottom based on GDP and job growth.
    Harvey Golub: ““Fiscal policy, under the control of the president and his party, increased expenditures by about $700 billion per year since 2008 and launched a spending package of about $800 billion (along with various “targeted” temporary tax reductions), all of which resulted in an increase in national debt of over $5 trillion. In other words, we borrowed $5 trillion, for which we will pay interest for who knows how long, in order to stimulate the economy now………….. The question is, was it a good investment? For the most part the money was spent poorly and we will get very little future value from it. Billions were spent to reward favored constituencies like government employees and the auto industry. Billions more were spent on training programs that don’t work and unemployment insurance that reduces incentives to actually find work. Little went toward building infrastructure or other assets that will help the nation create wealth over time.
    So, yes, we are going in the right direction—but far too slowly to create reasonable economic growth and needed jobs. By their very nature, recoveries involve people and businesses making investments and spending money and borrowing to do both. However, for rational people to spend or invest requires confidence in the future. ”

  3. Exasperated Says:

    Whether you agree with the WSJ article or not, for me, the real problem is the Walmartization of jobs (bifurcation of job quality, wage polarization). Neither party has stepped up with any outside the box ideas. The Republicans think that tinkering with taxes and growth are a magic bullet and the Dems think redistributing wealth is.
    Christopher Mims:
    “…. Worker compensation stagnates because, while automation makes each worker more productive, it doesn’t make them any more valuable. While all these machines and IT infrastructure do require a quasi-elite caste of Mandarins to keep them running, on the whole, the skill required of individual laborers has actually gone down.”
    As an example a longshoreman using today’s technology does the work of 24 longshoreman using 1970’s technology. However, the longshoremen do not benefit from this stunning increase in productivity, except indirectly through cheaper goods. The public and the leadership has failed to come to terms with the reality that increasing numbers of middle and lower tier jobs require an ever declining skill set and not much education; this is the opposite of what most of us grew up believing. Fix this, which is not just an American problem, and a lot of problems go away or become manageable.
    So what is the solution, subsidize people who are not carrying their weight, pay people to be couch potatoes, artificially prop up the wages of jobs that require a minimum of skill? That is not long term or doing anyone any favors. And thus far in the recovery, what growth has occurred has generated lots of low end manual jobs and high end specialist jobs. The midlevel skilled jobs, that used to be the backbone of the middle class tax payer and consumer, as a ratio of all jobs has continued to shrink. They were the most vulnerable to automation.

  4. Exasperated Says:

    Whether you agree with the WSJ article or not, for me, the real problem is the Walmartization of jobs (bifurcation of job quality, wage polarization). Neither party has stepped up with any outside the box ideas. The Republicans think that tinkering with taxes and growth are a magic bullet and the Dems think redistributing wealth is.
    Christopher Mims:
    “…. Worker compensation stagnates because, while automation makes each worker more productive, it doesn’t make them any more valuable. While all these machines and IT infrastructure do require a quasi-elite caste of Mandarins to keep them running, on the whole, the skill required of individual laborers has actually gone down.”
    As an example a longshoreman using today’s technology does the work of 24 longshoreman using 1970’s technology. However, the longshoremen do not benefit from this stunning increase in productivity, except indirectly through cheaper goods. The public and the leadership has failed to come to terms with the reality that increasing numbers of middle and lower tier jobs require an ever declining skill set and not much education; this is the opposite of what most of us grew up believing. Fix this, which is not just an American problem, and a lot of problems go away or become manageable.
    So what is the solution, subsidize people who are not carrying their weight, pay people to be couch potatoes, artificially prop up the wages of jobs that require a minimum of skill? That is not long term or doing anyone any favors. And thus far in the recovery, what growth has occurred has generated lots of low end manual jobs and high end specialist jobs. The midlevel skilled jobs, that used to be the backbone of the middle class tax payer and consumer, as a ratio of all jobs has continued to shrink since businesses get more bang for the buck eliminating them and they were vulnerable to automation.

  5. Jonny Says:

    I want back Bill Clinton
    :)

  6. khaki Says:

    Obama’s reelection is up to Angela Merkel.

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