19 American Soldiers Killed This Week In Iraq

By Justin Gardner | Related entries in Iraq, Military, War

Lest we forget…

BAGHDAD – A roadside bomb killed an American soldier in Baghdad on Saturday, capping the bloodiest week for U.S. troops in Iraq this year. Clashes persisted in Shiite areas, even as the biggest Shiite militia sought to rein in its fighters.

The U.S. military said the American soldier was killed in a blast Saturday morning in northwestern Baghdad but did not say whether Shiite militiamen were responsible.

The death raised to at least 19 the number of American troopers killed in Iraq since last Sunday.

So while we figure out what our next move is in the coming year or so, more brave men and women will die while the Iraqi politicos pull us into one fight after another to consolidate their own power. Because if Basra is any indication, the Iraqis aren’t interested in working toward political reconciliation or meeting any goals we’ve set.

And so it goes…


This entry was posted on Saturday, April 12th, 2008 and is filed under Iraq, Military, War. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

12 Responses to “19 American Soldiers Killed This Week In Iraq”

  1. Avinash_Tyagi Says:

    There are signs that the Sunnis are preparing to go to war with the Shiites with their newly formed Militisa, USA today has an article talking about the al-Sahwa sunni militia.

    That would put the US troops in the crossfire of multiple, large, well armed militias

    But the surge is working

  2. Eric Dondero Says:

    And how many were killed in a single hour on the beaches of Normandy? 19,000 maybe?

    Iwo Jima? Antietam? Gettbysburg?

    Have we become such a Weenie of a Nation that we can’t even stand for 4,000 War Dead. Pathetic! Absolutely Pathetic!

    I’m ashamed.

    Eric Dondero, United States Naval Veteran (Hon.)
    USS Kittyhawk CV-63
    USS Luce DDG-38
    1981-85

    PS I would gladly give my life for the honor of my country, as I know for a fact, the vast majority of those currently serving in the Armed Forces would do the same. It’s only those who don’t serve, or who have never served, who don’t understand that concept.

  3. Daniel Merritt Says:

    Eric: I’m well versed in military history, and understand the disproportionately low level of casualties in Iraq compared to major wars. Although D-day was ~2500 Allied dead through the whole night & day; Antietam ~3500 dead if you count both Union and Confederate. 3 days in Gettysburg would’ve been more than Iraq: close to 7000 taking average estimates for Confederate losses.

    Thus I would be entirely on your side were the deaths bringing progress toward an end goal like stopping imperialist Japan, toppling Nazi Germany, or abolishing slavery and re-uniting the country.

    But they aren’t.

    Those 4000 dead – plus the many associated maimed, wounded and traumatized – are at best allowing us to postpone a total implosion, slowly bleeding away lives and our military’s strength to keep Iraq in a state of total disaster instead of complete, total, and utter disaster. Meanwhile, the pressures under the surface continue to build, and the factions continue to maneuver, knowing sooner or later we have to turn our attention away, either for domestic politics or because another threat looms on the international scene. THEN we get complete, total, and utter disaster.

    Did you nod along when Bush talked in his 2000 campaign about how we were wasting our military peacekeeping and nation building? Because that’s really the last thing we can claim to be accomplishing in Iraq … maybe. Perhaps if we stay there for thirty years, accepting a slow drip of casualties, we can hold out until the waiting explosions fizzle away. But then again, we might just further antagonize the entire region and incite several generations of the area’s youth against us – not to the extent they’re angry at us today, but to the extent they’re angry at Israel today.

    There are a couple of other relevant factors:

    First, even if we make high assumptions about what we’re preventing by being in Iraq, our military is totally tied down there, and other countries know it. Do you think it’s a coincidence that Russia, North Korea, Iran, even Venezuela have become more assertive and anti-American since it became clear the Iraq war had failed to achieve its post-war goals and would occupy our military for years? If China adds itself to that list and decides its economic interests no longer coincide with ours (unlikely, but they are in a stronger bargaining position on eg Taiwan), that’s a lot of trouble we’ll be working to clean up for decades.

    Second, all the battles you named were fought in a state of total war. Regardless of who you were, it would have been pretty obvious the nation was at war, and it impacted your life. The heavy burdens of the Iraq war have been dropped on a very narrow slice of the American public.

    I certainly don’t feel at war on a day-to-day basis. Even on a yearly basis, leaving aside the political arguments, I think it’s basically a few big donations to the Intrepid Fallen Heroes fund, the death of someone I liked & admired from a blog in Iraq (OK, that was relatively noticeable), and briefly talking with a few family members of soldiers in Iraq or people who had served there.

    Third, we’re tearing to shreds our international position, not just militarily but diplomatically. In addition to being able to focus more of our own resources, I suspect we would see much more international cooperation on Afghanistan if we hadn’t invaded Iraq. At the very least, it wouldn’t have been so difficult for Musharraf to crack down on those supporting the Taliban across the border, as anti-American sentiment wouldn’t run so poisonously high. We’ve deeply alienated the population of our longest-term and most committed transatlantic partner, the UK, and the new government of Gordon Brown is slowly backing away – at least until Iraq is done. At least two hundred thousand Iraqis are dead, some from stray American munitions but most from bombings or death squads – which we are nonetheless blamed for, having destroyed the country’s previous ‘equilibrium’ and grossly mismanaged putting anything in its place.

    Although all the presidential candidates promise to restore relations with the international community, the simple fact is that there are going to still be many things America wants from other nations or things America is deeply devoted to and unwilling to ‘be flexible’ with. Unfortunately, we’ve lost the vast majority of our goodwill and political capital to push those values.

    I have no doubt that many in the armed forces would fight heroically and to their last breath to defend the United States. I’m sure there are plenty who would also fight and die for the country’s ‘honor’, so if nothing else we would not have to say that we ‘lost’. But I fear that even if their sacrifices are willingly given, continuing to fight and die in Iraq merely to say we were not defeated will mean calling on those soldiers much more in the future to die to restore the essential interests we are meanwhile damaging.

  4. Repack Rider Says:

    Eric,

    I’m US Army, E-5, 66-68

    Getting soldiers killed without a goal is insanity. Iwo Jima and Normandy were part of a coherent strategy that led to victory in a war where “victory” had an actual definition.

    Vietnam, which was the war for my generation, was not part of a coherent strategy, and a lot of people got killed for little other reason than to make military contractors rich. That seems to be the “cause” we’re fighting for again.

    Did you come under a lot of hostile fire during your peacetime, shipboard duties?

    No? Then don’t talk about your service as though it is equivalent to the guy doing his fourth tour in Iraq, mmmkay?

  5. Wub Wub Says:

    Wow, Eric Dondero was 0wned. Maybe even pwned!

  6. TerenceC Says:

    Eric

    I served twice as long as you did (84-92) and was involved in engagements in Panama and the first Gulf War. I take issue with your comments and do not understand how you could assume that it is a decent thing for our soldiers to die in a foreign land because our leaders told a series of lies.

    Our soldiers are heroes in my opinion because as fucked up as this situation is they still go – they follow their orders. It’s up to the American people to take the responsibility to insure our elected leaders aren’t war mongers who will callously kill our troops – unfortunately that is exactly what these leaders have done – and people like you allowed it.

    I especially liked your last paragraph. If you’re willing to give your life for the honor of your country then you wouldn’t mind going to Washington DC and protesting how dishonorable our nations activities have been since 9-11. War crimes, corruption at the highest levels, and undermining our republic – how does your honor code stack up against that?

  7. TomDem55 Says:

    Getting kinda hot here, ok my 2 cents, I did not serve in V-Nam, my dad hung up on the Air Force recruiter when I was 17, he said I’m not having any more of my sons in the God Damn Air Force, both my brothers joined, Dad was a WW2 marine (he did not see combat).
    I love my country, I REVERE the Constitution, and hate what the war profiteers and republicans’ have done to both.
    I honor all veterans service, even ones I don’t agree with, I come from that tradition, but please understand that the war in Iraq is not making us any safer, and is just filling the coffers of the “interests” as Teddy Roosevelt would have said (and he did say after Kettle Hill)
    Afghanistan is where the actual enemy is, THAT is where we should be in overwhelming force.

  8. Debi Brand Says:

    Gentlemen, if I may cut in here, join this lively candid conversation.

    Gold Star mom here, mother of one of our boys spent in this war, Sgt. Emerson Brand.

    One spent, who, like most of you have stated here, had his eyes opened on this war.

    One who was willing to die for the defense of his nation. Signed many a line stating he was willing to do so. But one who, because of the inanity of the “mission” he was charged with, one who died, spent strengthening a nation that is now–subsequent to our ousting of Saddam–governed by Islamic Fundamentalist.

    (Lest we forget: declared goal of Maliki’s Dawa Party is spreading Islam. Thank God we are behind. Indeed.)

    In other words, one who was, as have been most those in this war, spent foolishly.

    Sgt. “E-5,” thank you.

    Thank you, not for “defending us” and keeping us safe from our enemies–which, I know, and appreciate, that is what you signed up to do; thank you, not for going silently and sheepishly and dying in Iraq, but thank you, for speaking out on the inanity and futility you see in our spending of funds, lives, and limbs in Iraq.

    Thank you, for stating the facts most with eyes to see know: in Iraq, we have no attainable mission, thus no congruent strategy to anything that helps our nation.

    Please, correct me if I am wrong, but it was Islamic Fundamentalist that flew into the towers 9/11, was it not?

    How then, does it help us to strengthen, fund, arm, and train a nation governed by Islamic Fundamentalist? (Oh, that’s right, it’s those other Islamic Fundamentalist that are bad, not our Iraqi Islamic Fundamentalist friends and allies . . . )

    Thank all you men here, who state reality concerning the present effort to save Mr. Bush a legacy beyond one attesting to utter foolishness and carelessness, with respect to his choice in the spending of lives, funds, and our national prestige.

    dlb

  9. Donklephant » Blog Archive » Two Bombs Kill Dozens In Iraq Says:

    [...] this news and the recent uptick in troop deaths, April is looking to be the bloodiest this [...]

  10. Carol West Says:

    Having an only son killed in Iraq in March, an with no planning for this war the only comment I can say is BRING THEM HOME!

  11. Debi Brand Says:

    Carol, I sorrow with and for you.

    Please know you are not alone in your tears and ineffaceable grief.

    We so scared must band together–We war-bruised, we irreparably broken, we, who need not the stinging band-aid of another mother’s child’s death applied to our incurable wounds.

    Thus, broken hearted though we are, we must state facts on this war at every spot we can–at the gas station while we pump gas, at the grocery store, every time opportunity allows for such; on every blog site you frequent or visit. In short, state the facts of this war every time and place allowed you.

    Facts that show, our nation is spending our troops foolishly: it is spending them for no lasting gain.

    I challenge anyone to provide a fact based argument that proves me wrong.

  12. A Lindsay Says:

    Dondero says “PS I would gladly give my life for the honor of my country”

    Ok, but could you hurry up.

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