Electoral-Vote.com On Sarah Palin Pick

By Justin Gardner | Related entries in McCain, Palin

I think this pretty much sums up the collective opinion from non-partisan sites and sources (emphasis mine)…

Most neutral observers are scratching their heads. McCain’s strongest argument against Obama is that he doesn’t have the experience to be President. How can his first major personnel choice be someone with demonstrably less experience than Obama (6 years as mayor of a village with 5400 people and 21 months as governor vs. 8 years in the Illinois state senate and 3 1/2 years in the U.S. Senate)? Doesn’t that undermine his whole campaign? With so many solid choices available like governors Romney, Pawlenty, Sanford, and Ridge, why a total unknown who is being investigated by her own (Republican-controlled) legislature for possible ethical violations. What is McCain thinking?

One thing’s for sure…there’s gonna be a lot of pressure on this unknown, and she’s going to have to be gaffe-free throughout the next couple months in order for the American public to get comfortable enough to put her a heartbeat away.

And maybe it’s just me, but does it concern anybody else that we only get 2 months to find out who this woman is before we give her the 2nd most powerful job in the world? Sure, when compared to McCain, Obama hasn’t been around for a long time either, but at least we all started to get to know him in 2004.

So what exactly was McCain thinking beyond the idea that Palin could pull in some more independent female votes? Does he really think this is a good move for the country? Is he really putting “Country First” as he claims in his campaign commercials?


This entry was posted on Saturday, August 30th, 2008 and is filed under McCain, Palin. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

15 Responses to “Electoral-Vote.com On Sarah Palin Pick”

  1. phin Says:

    “And maybe it’s just me, but does it concern anybody else that we only get 2 months to find out who this woman is before we give her the 2nd most powerful job in the world? Sure, when compared to McCain, Obama hasn’t been around for a long time either, but at least we all started to get to know him in 2004.”

    Gee, it doesn’t seem to concern the Democrats that they chose the least qualified man from maybe the last 50+ years with not even a fraction of the experience that McCain has, to run for the most powerful political position on the damn planet. And this woefully inexperienced man would have no one to check his enormous arrogance, what with an overwhelming Dem congress, a fawning liberal base that has deified him and a media planted firmly up his ass (sound familiar, it should; it’s George W. Bush from 2000, expect without the adoring media). But ya know, the Dems put country first. The irony, the hypocrisy, the self-parody and the self-delusion are a marvel to behold.

  2. bubbles Says:

    Prediction: The Palin pick will have a greater impact on the “Horny White Guys” demographic than any other.

  3. stalkexpress Says:

    McCain must not have seen this local news report on Troopergate

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6UojMnCgqVA

  4. Avinash_Tyagi Says:

    phin, the difference is Obama has been vetted, he’s earned his spot by working hard to beat Hillary and fighting McCain, he was chosen by a democratic system and has been under the microscope for over a year. Palin has not, she was appointed by McCain, a 72 year old man with health concerns.

  5. phin Says:

    Palin is not running for POTUS my friend, Obama and McCain are. The VP spot is much less important than the the top job, and when you compare the two presidential candidates in terms of experience, it’s not even a contest. Now you could make the argument (which is the argument that Obama wants to make) that experience isn’t necessary and doesn’t guarantee a successful presidency. Fine. That’s an argument that can credibly be made depending on the candidate of course.

    And with all due respect, Obama hasn’t really proven anything expect that he can deliver a magnificent speech and run, so far, a very ho-hum kind of campaign. I mean, jeez, it’s still a contest when by all rights it should be a complete and utter blowout for the Dems. And lest we forget, Bush ran magnificent campaigns as well, given the weakness of his candidature. Remind me again how that worked out once he got to start governing. In fact, if the vetting was done right, by a less partisan media, than a good chunk of Obama’s career suggests that his rhetoric simply does not measure up to his past deeds and actions, unless seeking power for the sake of power now counts as a virtue.

    But here’s the bottom line: the GOP have put their inexperienced candidate in the VP slot. The Dems have put their inexperienced candidate in the POTUS slot. So who’s taking the major leap of faith here? And who is really taking a gamble with the future of the country? That answer is clear. It may yet prove to be a magnificent gamble on the part of Dems. I’m not willing at this point to discount that possibility (though I have my reservations, obviously). But it’s a huge gamble nonetheless, and of greater magnitude than McCain’s and the GOP.

  6. bubbles Says:

    On a more serious note… even though the whole experience arguments is kind of idiotic, it is effective. We forget that there is absolutely no correlation between the experience of presidential candidates and the degree of success in their administrations… so people assume that the most experienced person will do the best job. Remember, some highly-ranked presidents like Woodrow Wilson and Abraham Lincoln only had 2 years of experience beforehand (Lincoln a one-term member of the House; Wilson a first-term gov of NJ). Some with a great deal of experience turned out to be utter failures (Buchanan, A.Johnson, Harding). And then you had some with experience who did fine (Jackson, FDR), and some with less experience who did not perform too well (Taylor, Carter).

    But the experience argument has become somewhat of an intoxicant with voters… dumbing them into thinking that years served will equate to a better president. This is unfortunate. I’m far more concerned about what a candidate’s plan for the future is rather than their past. If Obama can make the case that he’s going to be the best guy for the United States, I’ll be voting for him. And if McCain can do the same, I’ll vote for him. I don’t care if these guys have 40 years of experience or just graduated from a community college with an associates degree in car repair. If they can persuasively argue the case of why the country needs them most, then I can vote for them regardless of their past (assuming their past isn’t full of outrageous lies and corruption).

    As far as Palin goes, I don’t dismiss her despite having only slightly more pre-VP experience than Garret Hobart. For the most part my vote won’t be determined by Palin or Biden, but if she can present the case that she’s going to do the job responsibly and understands her duties then I certainly won’t be voting against her. I’m a huge Biden fan personally but even my immense respect for the guy isn’t going to guarantee my vote for Obama. See my point?

    Let’s stop focusing on experience and instead take a look at what these candidates stand for, how they plan to enact their policies, and what it would mean for the American people.

    Ok bye.

  7. Avinash_Tyagi Says:

    Considering McCain’s age and health, she might as well be running for Potus, if he pulls a Harrison, she’s in and that is scary.

    Obama has run an excellent campaign, no he shouldn’t be blowing out McCain, because McCain isn’t a standard rep, people still think he’s pro choice, the media has run interference for him for years

    The fact remains Obama has worked for his place at the top of the ticket, Plain was gifted her spot, after only two meetings, and is dangerously unready to be president

  8. Ed in NJ Says:

    Republicans are silly.

    McCain undermines his own arguments, and his minions twist themselves in knots to spin the experience issue back in their favor. I sat in a barber shop today while two dopes tried to argue that Palin has executive experience and therefore is more qualified than McCain, all the while losing site that McCain has no executive experience.

    Anyone who refuses to recognize the difference in experience between Palin and Obama is not ever going to look at the issue rationally. Obama has immersed himself in foreign and domestic issues for years in preparation for the presidency. Knock that if you want to, it’s fair to say he’s been running for president since he was elected to the Senate. But Palin just two years ago was the mayor of a small town in Alaska and admittedly has not even followed the Iraq war, let alone familiarized herself with any foreign or domestic policy issues.

  9. N from Alaska Says:

    Palin is leaving behind a plethora of unfinished work in Alaska to take part in this campaign. Her second-in-command is awaiting election results that will determine if he is the Republican nominee for the only Alaska seat in the US House of Representatives. If she leaves behind unfinished business, it may turn out that all her supposed accomplishments in Alaska will go down the drain. Her choice to accept McCain’s offer shows irresponsibility on her part and a willingness to abandon her obligations here for personal ambition. It is true that others running still have responsibilities to fulfill, but here there are major projects in process that she personally set in motion – the proposed natural gas pipeline for one. The Obama campaign office in Anchorage told me they ran out of lawn signs the day she was announced as the VP choice – and some of those who came in were Republicans. Alaska loved her as a governor, for the most part, but may not feel the same way about her new endeavors.

  10. Bob Aman Says:

    If I was Axelrod, I’d let the commentators run with it. At most, reinforce the idea that McCain is pandering to the demographics and considering only the effects his VP will have on the campaign rather than the effects she’ll have on the country over the next four years. There might be some opportunities for criticism on energy policy as well, since we already know how well people with ties to the oil industry work out in the White House.

    But mostly, they should be letting the pundits go wild. Most Americans are going to be puzzled, and that can only be good for Obama.

  11. Donklephant » Blog Archive » Chuck Todd on why McCain picked Palin Says:

    [...] Despite my repeated and patient explanations, Justin continues to be confused about the reason for the Palin pick and is wondering again “what exactly was MCain thinking?”. [...]

  12. pico Says:

    Not that it matters much, but does anybody know the official population of the town she was mayor of for ten years? Each article I read seems to give a different number, anywhere from 5400 to 9000. Are these numbers taken from different years or what?

  13. gerryf Says:

    According to the official city website, 6,715 folks

    http://www.cityofwasilla.com/index.aspx?page=1

  14. Mark from Jersey Says:

    It seems that McCain solidified the republican base choosing Palin and although many claimm she does not have the experience. In fact, she has more executive experience that the front runner being Obama. Most people usually vote for the Presidential candidate and largely ignore the VP, but this election will surely be dictated on the outcome of the VP debates as Biden and Palin as most voters are split on the issues. Definitely, this election is the most interesting I have seen in my lifetime.

  15. What Was McCain Thinking? « Says:

    [...] Lieutenant Governor of Alaska by a margin of less than 2,000 votes. She has only been Governor for 21 months. Foreign Policy Experience: None. Washington Political Experience: None. Moose Hunting Experience: [...]

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